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Cinnamon Espresso Oatmeal Cookies

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These soft cinnamon espresso oatmeal cookies are a coffee and cookie lover’s dream! Naturally sweetened and kicking with flavour, these cookies are made for your mid-morning jolt.

Soft cinnamon and espresso oatmeal cookies with dark chocolate drizzle.

If you’ve been a part of this community for a while, you know that it’s not often one of my recipes turns out spectacularly the first time (case in point: this red velvet cake). Which is why I was so shocked when I took the first batch of these Cinnamon Espresso Oatmeal Cookies out of the oven. I was so pleased with the taste and texture that I did a little happy dance and whipped out my camera.

I then proceeded to bake them two more times just to be sure the cookie gods weren’t messing with me. #paranoid

Thankfully, I wasn’t deceived. They’re just THAT GOOD. It must have something to do with the magical combination of cinnamon and espresso. Honestly, I don’t believe you can ever go wrong with these flavours. The last time I used this combination it was for a bundt cake I made for The Cinnamon Scrolls; that cake was actually the inspiration for this oatmeal cookie recipe.

I’ve been wanting to pair cinnamon and espresso again for a long time, but I knew they needed the right vehicle. Oatmeal cookies, with their soft centres and crispy edges, seemed like the perfect way to get the kids back together.

The oats lend a lovely chewy texture and the mixture of caramelly coconut sugar and crispy raw cane sugar make these cookies just sweet enough to combat the slight spicy bitterness of the cinnamon and espresso. Topped with a drizzle of dark chocolate, these puppies are lethal.

I think I ate three within the first hour. You’ve been warned.

Chewy oatmeal cookies flavoured with coffee and cinnamon and completely refined sugar free.

What kind of oats do you use for cookies?

The humble rolled oat (or old fashioned oat) is the best variety to use in cookies. They retain their natural shape and texture when mixed with liquid ingredients, unlike quick cooking oats which turn to mush. They also provide a slight chew to the end result.

Likewise, I wouldn’t use steel cut oats as these are too tough and you’ll probably unhinge your jaw with the amount of chewing.

Tips for making these cinnamon espresso oatmeal cookies

To really get the flavours punching in this cinnamon espresso oatmeal cookies recipe, you’re going to want to get yourself two important things:

The first is fresh ground cinnamon. If you don’t bake often, you’ll want to check the date on your cinnamon and make sure it hasn’t expired. Similarly, if the package has been open for quite some time, chances are the flavour won’t be as potent. Grab yourself some new cinnamon or grate it yourself from a cinnamon stick for truly exceptional cookies.

The second is instant espresso powder. This is very different to regular instant coffee, which resembles granules. The granules will not dissolve into the oatmeal cookie batter like the espresso powder will, so please do not attempt it. I also find that espresso powder is generally a lot stronger in flavour, so you don’t need as much. I use Percol’s Noir Espresso Powder.

Chewy and naturally sweet cinnamon and espresso flavoured oatmeal cookies.

As mentioned above, rolled (or old fashioned) oats are best used for this recipe. They hold up when beat together with the other ingredients and add a lovely texture to the final result. If you want to be extra, you can even lightly toast your oats beforehand to give the cookies a subtle nutty flavour.

In the method of the recipe, I suggest that you roll the finished dough into portions before you chill them in the refrigerator. You don’t necessarily have to do this – you can chill the dough in the bowl and roll them into balls afterward – but I noticed the cookies retain their round shape best when rolled then chilled.

And on that note, yes, you do need to chill this dough for at least 1 hour before baking. I usually chill mine for at least 6 hours. I know, I know. Torture! But the chilling process is vital to develop the flavours and solidify the butter. If you pop these bad boys into the oven while the butter in the dough is soft, they will spread out into a squiggly, unpresentable mess.

Refined sugar free chewy espresso oatmeal cookies with a hint of cinnamon.

These cinnamon espresso oatmeal cookies are literally a dream come true for me. Cinnamon and coffee are two of my favourite flavours to bake with and pair so well together with the oats and chocolate drizzle. I know you’re going to love them as much as I do!

If you make this recipe, let me know by snapping a picture and tagging me on Instagram @naturallysweet_kitchen. I love seeing your creations and sharing them in my Stories!

Looking for more naturally sweet coffee time treats?

Cinnamon Espresso Oatmeal Cookies

These soft cinnamon and espresso oatmeal cookies are naturally sweetened and a perfect mid-morning pick me up.

Category Cookies
Keyword cinnamon and espresso, espresso oatmeal cookies, oatmeal cookies
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Chill 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 25 minutes
Serves 18
Author Amanda | Naturally Sweet Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 180 g rolled oats
  • 95 g plain flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp espresso powder (not instant granules)
  • ½ tsp fine sea salt
  • 85 g unsalted butter room temperature
  • 50 g raw cane sugar
  • 110 g coconut sugar
  • 1 large egg room temperature
  • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp milk
  • 50 g dark chocolate roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp coconut oil

Method

  1. Prepare a baking tray with a reusable silicone baking mat or non-stick parchment paper.
  2. Tip the oats, flour, baking soda, cinnamon, espresso powder, and salt into a large bowl and whisk to combine well. Set aside.
  3. Add the butter, cane sugar, and coconut sugar to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Beat the butter and sugars together on medium-high speed until pale and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
  4. Crack in the egg, add the vanilla, and mix to combine.
  5. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients in two parts on a medium-low speed.
  6. Once the dry ingredients are incorporated, add the milk to loosen the dough slightly. Beat on high speed for 30 seconds.
  7. Divide the mixture into 18-20 portions. Each portion should be about 1 ½ tablespoons of dough. Roll the portions into balls and place on the cookie sheet. Refrigerate the dough balls for 1 hour on the tray.
  8. Preheat the oven to 190ºC (375ºF).
  9. Bake the cookies for 10-12 minutes, or until golden on the bottom. Allow the cookies to cool on the tray for 5 minutes before removing them to a wire rack to finish cooling.

  10. Make the drizzle while the cookies are cooling. Place the chopped chocolate and coconut oil in a bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Make sure the bowl doesn’t touch the water. Using a spatula, stir the chocolate and oil together until emulsified.
  11. Drizzle the melted chocolate over the cooled cookies.

Notes

  • It’s important to use espresso powder for these cookies, not instant coffee. The powder is fine enough to melt into the batter and has a stronger flavour. This is the brand I use.
  • These cookies will keep for up to 3 days sealed in an airtight container at room temperature.
These soft and chewy cinnamon and espresso oatmeal cookies are refined sugar free and pair perfectly with your mid-morning coffee.

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6 Comments

  1. Hi, should I use only cane sugar instead of coconut? I like muscovado very much. In Italy it’s not easy to find coconut sugar too.

    1. Hi Giada! The coconut sugar is the replacement for muscovado sugar in this recipe. I haven’t tested this recipe with all cane sugar, but I imagine the cookies would be a lot more crispy (not chewy) and probably quite a bit sweeter! Let me know what happens if you give it a go!

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